Massive Interest In Maryland Medical Marijuana Licenses

Maryland - Medical Marijuana
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The  Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission (MMCC) says it has received 882 applications for medicinal cannabis grower, processor and dispenser licenses in the state.

705 applications were for dispenser licenses; with some applicants submitting for a dispensary in each of the state’s senatorial districts.

102 grower and 75 processor license applications were also received by the Commission by the November 6 submission deadline.

Just 15 grower licenses will be made available in Maryland, along with an unlimited number of processor licenses; plus up to two dispensaries per each of the state’s senatorial districts. With 47 senatorial districts in the Maryland, that means a maximum of 94 dispensaries.

Dispensaries will be able to sell medicinal marijuana in processed form or dried flower, plus supply devices to administer the products.

Licensed processors will be able to produce cannabis in forms including extracts, oils, and tinctures; but not as edibles.

Licensed growers will be permitted to become vertically integrated operations, i.e. also incorporating processing and dispensary type roles. For vertical integrated concerns, parties were required to submit separate applications for each function.

The MMCC says it was very happy with the level of interest in licensing.

“We couldn’t be more pleased by the tremendous response to the application process,” said Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission Executive Director Hannah Byron. “The number of applications received ensures the Commission will have a strong pool of qualified candidates to consider as the review process moves forward and that the state’s medical cannabis program will be self‐funded as intended by the General Assembly.”

Given the volume of license applications, the application review period will be extended.

Towson University’s Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI) will undertake the professional evaluation of applicants and further evaluation will be carried by third party matter experts before Stage 1 license approvals are granted.

Each Stage 1 license recipient then has 365 days to clear all the necessary further hurdles to obtain a full license – such as raising capital, acquiring a premises and hiring and training of staff – and to request final inspection by the MMCC.

The Commission anticipates medical cannabis could become available to patients in Maryland in the second half of next year. Patients will be permitted possess a 30-day supply; but the amount is yet to be determined by the MMCC.

Patients will need to obtain a medical certificate from an appropriately licensed doctor in order to join the program, plus submit an application for a Maryland medical marijuana card.